What to make Richmond Hill Park better? Here’s how to get involved.

From    http://mountaintrue.org/2nd-saturdays-richmond-hill-park-invasive-plant-removal-work-days/

2nd Saturdays: Richmond Hill Park invasive plant removal work days for 2015

Join us and help restore native plant communities by controlling non-native invasive plants at Richmond Hill Park. This is the City of Asheville’s only forested park and is home to many special native plant and animal species!

We’ll provide all gloves, equipment and instruction needed. Please bring snacks, water, rain jacket and wear long pants, long sleeve shirt and closed toe shoes (no open shoes or sandals allowed for safety).

Dates:
May 9
June 13
July 11
August 8
September 12
October 10
November 14
December 12
Rain Dates: 2nd Sundays
Time: 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Please RSVP 
Volunteers removing multiflora rose and privet that was overgrowing the trail. Trail maintenance like this is vital for keeping the park usable for all park visitors.

Volunteers removing multiflora rose and privet that was overgrowing the trail. Trail maintenance like this is vital for keeping the park usable for all park visitors.

Cost: Free; Thank you for you help!

November 14

December 12
Rain Dates: 2nd Sundays
Time: 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
Cost: Free; Thank you for you help!

Richmond Hill Park Non-Native Invasive Plant Removal Event, July 12th

Richmond Hill Park Non-Native Invasive Plant Removal Event, July 12th

Don’t forget about WNCA’s ongoing non-native invasive removal project at Richmond Hill Park. The event takes place the second Saturday of every month, from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm. To sign up for this, or a later event, please go to SignUp Genius.
Over about the last 3 years work in the park has changed an area covered in privet and multiflora rose into a beautiful wildflower cover wonderland for wildlife. Come out and help keep the trails open and park beautiful.

Racing snails

If you walk down to Smith Creek you might spy an interesting sight. Snails, lots of snails. In some places they are very abundant, eating algae off the rocks and zipping along under the water. In places where there is bedrock in the stream the current is fast you may even see lines of them, just out of the main current. Snail can be an indicator or water quality and worth paying attention to.

Here they look like racing snails.

Snails in Smith Creek

Snails in Smith Creek

 Racing Snails

Don’t forget to follow Friends of Richmond Hill Park by clicking the tab on the upper left.