Workday Pictures

June 15th, 2013 – Headed in the right direction and making big gains.

Volunteers removing multiflora rose and privet that was overgrowing the trail. Trail maintenance like this is vital for keeping the park usable for all park visitors.

Volunteers removing multiflora rose and privet that was overgrowing the trail. Trail maintenance like this is vital for keeping the park usable for all park visitors.

Volunteers are trained on how to identify and safely remove invasive exotic species.

Volunteers are trained on how to identify and safely remove invasive exotic species.

Volunteers working hard to beat back the invasives to keep this city park headed in the right direction.

Volunteers working hard to beat back the invasives to keep this city park headed in the right direction.

Their work keeps the trails open for all park uses. Under the branches of multiflora rose and privet, trillium was trying to grow.

Their work keeps the trails open for all park uses. Under the branches of multiflora rose and privet, trillium was trying to grow.

Bob Gale (left) from the Western North Carolina Alliance explaining why it is important to remove invasive exotic plants and how to do it safely.

Bob Gale (left) from MountainTrue explaining why it is important to remove invasive exotic plants and how to do it safely.

Our happy and hungry work crew.

Our happy and hungry work crew.

Our happy and hungry work crew. Thank you for all you help!

Our happy and hungry work crew. Thank you for all you help!

Volunteers enjoy some delicious pizza donated by Mellow Mushroom in downtown Asheville. Thank you Mellow Mushroom for supporting us!

Volunteers enjoy some delicious pizza donated by Mellow Mushroom in downtown Asheville. Thank you Mellow Mushroom for supporting us!

December 15th 2012 Workday Pictures – Making steady progress… waiting for spring. 

With the help of volunteers the difference is becoming substantial. We worked in the same area, cutting down privet bushes, multi-flora roses and bittersweet. We uncovered several small trees that had been engulfed by exotic invasive plants. Park visitors will be rewarded this spring when the native wildflower finally get a chance to spread their leaves.

Bob Gale from WNCA talked to the volunteers about how to use equipment and why it is important to manage invasive speices

Bob Gale from MountainTrue talking to the volunteers about how to use equipment and why it is important to manage invasive species.  Edna’s of Asheville generously donated coffee to help fire up our volunteers.

Two volunteers, Kasey Christian and Jessica Potter-Bowers, removing privet along the hill side. Last year, before management began, you wouldn't have even been able to seen them due to the privet bushes.

Two volunteers, Kasey Christian and Jessica Potter-Bowers, removing privet along the hill side. Last year, before management began, you wouldn’t have even been able to seen them due to the privet bushes.

Privet and multiflora rose had begun to encroach on the trail, making it difficult to use to trail. In the spring wildflowers will line trail instead. The siltnet in the foreground is from earlier development plans in the park that were abandoned for more environmentally responsible plans.

Privet and multi-flora rose had begun to encroach on the trail, making it difficult to use the trail. Volunteers removed these weeds and now wildflowers will be able to grow and  line the trail in the spring. The silt-net in the foreground is from an earlier development plan for the park that was abandoned for a more environmentally responsible plan.

A much appreciated pizza donation by Asheville Pizza and Brewing company refueled the volunteers. Bob Gale gave a talk about how WNCA has been working with companies like Lowes to switch from selling exotic-invasive plants to native plants that serve the same purpose.

A much appreciated pizza donation by Asheville Pizza and Brewing company and water in biodegradable bottles by Blue Moon Water refueled the volunteers. Bob Gale gave a talk about how MountainTruehas been working with companies like Lowes to switch from selling exotic-invasive plants to native plants that serve the same purpose.

Down on the valley floor there are now openings for native plants to take root. This area will need more work, removing Japanese honeysuckle will further improve this area. Native plants will improve the habitat for birds, salamanders and other wildlife.

Down on the valley floor there are now openings for native plants to take root. This area will need more work, removing Japanese honeysuckle will further improve this area. Native plants will improve the habitat for birds, salamanders and other wildlife.

This big mass of bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) was cut from this tree. Over the next year or so, these vines will fall down and free this tree from their diabolical pull.

This big mass of bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) was cut from this tree. Over the next year or so, these vines will fall down and free this tree from their diabolical pull.

This is front line of invasive removal. We've pushed the masses of invasive species back, but this is front line. Not far beyond this point is where the wetland starts, and where we'll pickup next time we're out in the park. We hope you'll join us on the next outing.

This is the front line of invasive removal (note Bob in the background). We’ve pushed the masses of invasive species back, but this is the front line. Not far beyond this point is where the wetland starts, and where we’ll be picking up here next time we’re out in the park. We hope you’ll join us on the next outing.

October 20th 2012 Workday – Pictures of progress

We’ve been making good progress at removing privet and other invasive plants. Take a look at these picture from October. We’ve been working in the same area, so these are before and after pictures. The yellow leaves  are spice bush, small native tree with red berries and a spicy scent.

Looking from the bridge at where invasive control was started about 1 year ago. It looks great!

Looking down the drainage at where invasive exotic plants were removed about 1 year ago. The yellow is the native spice bush. This area was dominated with the exotic evergreen privet. Looking good!

Looking down into the drainage from the trail, a little further down the drainage from the bridge mentioned in other pictures. This area was solid with evergreen privet, multiflora rose and honeysuckle. This looks great and provides places for wild flowers to grow in spring!

This is what happens when invasive exotic plants take over. The green is all privet, multiflora rose and honey suckle. These exotic invasive plants take over, push out native plants and reduce the quality of forest, i.e. no wildflower, fewer birds, less biodiversity. This is what the area looked like in the other pictures before we tackled these weeds! This is why we need your help, you can make a difference.

April 4th 2012 Workday

In the foreground you can see Spring Beauty blooming next to a May Apple. In the background you can see Multiflora Rose and Bittersweet vines that have been recently cut.

December 2011 Workday Pictures

Work Area Before Removal

Richmond Hill before removal of Privet which was competing with the native spice bush (Lindera benzoin)

Picture of the workday

Pictures from Richmond Hill Park

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